The hidden Hoysala temples of Marale and Mosale

Some of India’s best kept secrets cannot be found on a map. Tucked away inside golden fields with lotus ponds surrounding them are small, little-known ancient temples that are steeped in history. Marale and Mosale are two such.


When I embarked on the quest of traversing rustic Karnataka looking for lesser known Hoysala temples, little did I know that I would stumble upon an obscure village that may hold clues to the origins of the dynasty. I am not referring to Angadi, the soseyuru of the ancient Hoysalas, where myth and history converge, where legends claim that Sala slew the tiger and founded the dynasty at the behest of his guru or where historians claim that the oldest ever Hoysala monuments were built. I am referring to a pair of twin temples found in picturesque villages and my trail began with one of them – Marale. Located between Belur and Chikmagalur, it is home to one of the earliest twin temples of the Hoysala dynasty.

I learned that Marale had an interesting link with the origin of the dynasty. An inscription here threw some light on the history of the Hoysalas, who were referred to as Male chiefs of “chieftains of the hills” and were considered vassals of the Chalukya kings. The village was apparently once the home of the early chieftains and the name “Poysala" for the first name is recorded in history here.  

An inscription here says that Poysala Maruga, grandson of the chieftain Arakalla, fought a war against his contemporaries. The year mentioned is around 940-950 AD. Although historians remain divided over the findings, the origins of the dynasty are mired in myth, legend and clues from inscriptions. I went looking for the temples.

 

The Hoysala emblem at the Chennakeshava temple in Belur depicts the fight between the mythical Sala and a tiger, the emblem of the Cholas. Historians and scholars believe it represents King ... more 
The Hoysala emblem at the Chennakeshava temple in Belur depicts the fight between the mythical Sala and a tiger, the emblem of the Cholas. Historians and scholars believe it represents King Vishnuvardhana's victory over the Cholas at Talakad.

ABOUT THE PHOTOGRAPHER:
ANANTH V RAO is an engineer by profession and a hobbyist photographer with a passion for picturing architectural grandeur as well as nature and wildlife. He was born and brought up in Hassan, Karnataka, a place known for its culture and heritage. He lives in Bangalore. less 
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Yahoo Lifestyle | Photo by Ananth V Rao
Thu 19 Apr, 2012 3:30 PM IST
The village was virtually empty. The fields were harvested. The lake beds were dry. I was looking for two ancient temples built adjacent to each other. Most Hoysala temples are referred to as Ekakuta or Trikuta, depending on the number of shrines and towers built on them. The Belur Chennakesava temple, for instance, is an Ekakuta, while the Kappe Channigraya temple built next door is a dvikuta, with two shrines. My search for two ekakuta temples, resembling each other, took me down a small path into a vast open space. A lone lady tending her flock of cattle pointed to a row of coconut trees and peeping behind them were two Vimanas or towers. Shrouded by greenery, there were two petite temples -- one dedicated to Shiva and the other to Vishnu. Adorned with a single tower each, the Ekakuta temples were called Keshava and Siddeshwara.

A priest had just visited them and left the lamps burning. Bright yellow flowers stood out against the dark stone idols. Two beautiful carved elephants with lotuses in their hands greeted the visitor at the entrance of the Keshava temple. The ceiling and the outer walls were carved with floral motifs and sculptures, although they were not as ornate as the other temples. A stone carving of Ganesha stood at the Siddeshwara temple. The guardians who protect the various directions, the Ashtadikpalakas, were carved as well.

It was absolutely silent but for the birds. As I looked around, a 12-feet stone inscription stood amidst the temples, but the information was absolutely lost to me. I spent some time sitting beside the temples, hoping a priest would come by to throw some light, but only a few cattle grazed around. Marale seemed to be another quaint village with a piece of antiquity lost in the wilderness.

Another village close to Hassan that takes its name from a crocodile, Mosale is home to another perfect twin. Built in the reign of Veera Ballala in 1200 AD, the Nagesvara and the Chennakesava temples resemble each other in their architectural styles, but for the deities that they are dedicated to. It was not difficult to find them. The roads, flanked by green fields, took us to an enclosure where the temples were surrounded by walls and seemed to be maintained well. As we walked in, we saw a family sitting on the porches in the midst of worship.

Known as Dwarasamudra in the 12th and 13th centuries, Halebeedu was the capital of Hoysala Empire. It is situated at a distance of about 30 kms from Hassan, Karnataka. The name Dwarasamudra (Dwara = ... more 
Known as Dwarasamudra in the 12th and 13th centuries, Halebeedu was the capital of Hoysala Empire. It is situated at a distance of about 30 kms from Hassan, Karnataka. The name Dwarasamudra (Dwara = Entrance, Samudra = Sea) came due to the presence of a lake constructed beside the Hoysaleshwara temple, which resembled the sea. It then changed to Halebeedu (ruined city) after it was laid to ruin by the Moghul sultanate twice. The Halebeedu temple is considered as the ultimate work of Hoysalas and it took more than a century to complete building.

ABOUT THE PHOTOGRAPHER:
ANANTH V RAO is an engineer by profession and a hobbyist photographer with a passion for picturing architectural grandeur as well as nature and wildlife. He was born and brought up in Hassan, Karnataka, a place known for its culture and heritage. He lives in Bangalore. less 
1 / 16
Yahoo Lifestyle | Photo by Ananth V Rao
Fri 4 May, 2012 1:30 PM IST
 We heard that the village was the hermitage of the sage Jamadhagni. Unlike Marale, the temples here are ornate and decorated with carvings. There is not a single stone left uncarved – walls, ceilings, friezes are all filled with sculptures. You can see some of the sculptures carved on the panels of these temples and some of the deities have been named. While the Nagesvara temple has forms of Parvati, Bhumadevi, Shiva, Brahma among others, the Kesava temple has various forms of Vishnu and Krishna as Kesava, Madhava, Venugopal and Garuda. Some historians say that the temple complex looks like a dvikuta with two shrines and towers, as they are both aligned and identical.

I sit on the porch awhile, along with other women, listening to some of them sing. As the wind blows in my face, I lose track of time. Finally, as I leave, I see the familiar Hoysala crest looking down at me - Sala slaying the tiger.

FOLLOW THE HOYSALA TRAIL

Five Hoysala temples off the tourist map

In the lost kingdom of Dwarasamudra
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